Tuesday, August 15, 2017

VIDEO: "HIDDEN FIGURES"

Welcome to the 2017-2018 school year, students!  We will spend the next 182 days of instruction studying the fundamentals of Chemistry.

A major focus of interest for chemists is pursuing all the different ways that matter and energy can be arranged.  Much of that knowledge can not be predicted in advance by any theory, but instead can only be determined by experimental investigation.   For this reason, Chemistry is an 'in-between science' focused tightly on the design, performance and analysis of experiments.  This emphasis on the experiment requires chemists to use math constantly:  in a sense, Chemistry is a math course with scientific application.

To help students understand the importance of math to science, and how mastering mathematics opens doors for tackling all kinds of problems, students will be asked to consider the true story of the West End Computer Section in U.S. space program, as shown in the film 'Hidden Figures.'   They will see how an unappreciated group of human 'computers' used their abilities to approach scientific and social problems, and how they did their part to achieve great things.

Here is a brief trailer for the film.  It shows an outline of the film's story:



Also, here is a short feature about the making of the film. In this feature, you will learn how author Margo Lee Shetterly, who wrote the book on which the film was based, grew up learning about the 'human computers' at West End, and how she became convinced that she needed to tell the story of women like Katherine Johnson and Dorothy Vaughn:

 

Monday, July 10, 2017

DAY 8: NOTES, POWER POINTS

***UPDATE***

The FINAL in this course will be administered after the break (11:05-1:55) on Wed., July 12th.  

NO HOMEWORK WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER WEDNESDAY, ONLY CLASSWORK

Mr.Hatfield's 2nd-session Chemistry students took their third test today.   A class roster of 44 has now been reduced to 23 actively attending.   

The good news is that some have raised their output in the course, and now have a passing grade.  The concern is that still too many students are failing to complete work outside of class, and thus are in danger of not passing the course.   With that in mind, here are more resources to help students 'up their game' .

FIRST:   Students received notes on reaction rates and equilibrium constants in class.   A copy of the Notes can be found HERE:



NEXT:  Students will be using a third Study Guide to complete the rest of their Notes, based  on material from Chapter 19.   They can download a copy of the Power Point containing those Notes HERE:


FINALLY:  Students were given a worksheet based on the following video, shown in class.   This worksheet is due tomorrow!

You can view the video, below:

It demonstrates the centrality of water to most acid-base chemistry, and explains how to calculate equilibrium constants for acids (Ka) and bases (Kb), and how to express those as pKa's or pKb's:




Friday, July 7, 2017

DAY 7: EQUILIBRIUM

Students:  here is Paul Andersen's video on 'Equilibrium', the final video worksheet this week:



There is also a link to where you can download a PDF version of the video worksheet, HERE.

The final unit comes next week.   Students can download a copy of the Power Point containing those Notes, over the weekend HERE:



Thursday, July 6, 2017

DAY 6: ENTHALPY OF REACTION

Students began the morning session today by attempting the second test, which covered gas laws.   A very large number of students were not prepared, judging by their Composition Books. If students don't complete work assigned outside of class the same date it is assigned, they will fall further and further behind.

With that in mind, the  following video by Paul Anderson was introduced in class on Day 5 (July 5th).   It helpfully reviews some of the information already given in lecture regarding heat and the enthalpy of reactions. It also features a very handy, step-by-step demonstration of how to apply Hess's Law (a SUBTLE and advanced topic) to calculate enthalpies.




Students have an assignment based on that video, which is available HERE as a PDF file.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

DAY 5: THERMOCHEMISTRY

Students today performed the 'Boyle's Law Lab' and the calculations based on it, which should include a pair of graphs.   This and the previous lab will be graded based on the completed Lab Report in student's Composition Books, during their . . .

TEST # 2, WHICH HAPPENS AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS, TOMORROW!

Students are reminded that they should have all the notes on properties of gases and gas laws in their Comp Books, which they are allowed to use during the exam.

AND, speaking of Notes . . . .

Here are the Power Point Notes for the next section of this course: Thermochemistry.  




In this you will find discussions of phase changes (again!),  heat transfer, the 1st and 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics, and problems to calculate energy (q) , specific heats and enthalpies of reaction:

Click here to download those notes.

Monday, July 3, 2017

DAY 4: COURSE UPDATE

Students took their first Unit Test at the beginning of this day of instruction.

This test focused primarily on review material from the first semester (periodic table, molar masses, moles and stoichiometry) that is required to understand other material in the course: gas laws, thermochemistry, equilibrium and acid-base problems. 

Calculations were thus confined to review material.  Calculations based on gas law problems will appear on Unit Test 2, which will be given on Day 7, July 6th.

UNFORTUNATELY, 12 STUDENTS FAILED TO ATTEND TODAY.   


  • FIVE STUDENTS NOW HAVE MORE THAN TWO ABSENCES, AND WILL BE DROPPED.

  • TWO STUDENTS NOW HAVE TWO ABSENCES, AND ARE AT RISK OF BEING DROPPED.

  • THREE OTHER STUDENTS WHO FAILED TO ATTEND TODAY HAVE F's IN THE COURSE, AND MUST MAKE UP THEIR UNIT 1 TEST, WHILE DOING ALL THE REST OF THE WORK:  THIS WAS A BAD CHOICE, AND THEY ARE LIKELY TO FAIL  




Friday, June 30, 2017

DAY 3: CAN CRUSH LAB

Students present on Friday's class performed a lab that illustrates the effects of air pressure.   Many earned extra credit by bringing aluminum cans to class.  The data collected on their lab papers should be copied along with the setup information on those papers into their COMPOSITION BOOK.

What is students weren't present on Friday's class?  This video shows another group of students, doing essentially the same activity:




This LAB REPORT, inside their notebook, is what will be graded.   It will include a pair of drawings using colored pencils in which students attempt to explain what they have seen in class, and it will also feature their attempts to calculate the force involved in the lab. 

Those calculations can be summarized as follows: